What’s the future of the British high street? 

@3 weeks ago

maghrabiyya:

micdotcom:

11 ways to solve rape better than nail polish

The more we depend on women to prevent rape, the easier it is to blame them when it happens to them. Here’s a look at the well-documented ways we can actually stop rape. Maybe it’s time we invest a little more time and resources into implementing them before we send gallons of nail polish to colleges across the country.

Read the full list | Follow micdotcom

I’ve known too many women to be raped, had nurses and liaison officers tell them that they had enough evidence, and then the police do fuck all to the rapist and let him walk free and continue his life as normal while the victim has to struggle every day to cope with the shit they put them through.

This has happened to too many women I love. Way too fucking many.

One person I know who was raped, the police even found CCTV footage of the actual incident, but apparently that wasn’t enough to convict him either.

Think about that.

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@1 month ago with 82847 notes

de-la-music:

I miss this guy

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@1 month ago with 46218 notes
@1 month ago with 21 notes
#cary fukunaga #beyonce 
fernwah:

oh man she just said it 

fernwah:

oh man she just said it 

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@3 months ago with 388398 notes

Sure…they really are bastards.

(Source: omfgrant, via smile-andf-cktherest)

@3 months ago with 565903 notes

msjwilly:

 because i’m happy  

Sorry guys. But also I’m not sorry guys. This gif set is literally a dream come true for me. Jah bless the soul that made this.

(Source: emilyisobsessed, via beharie-nyongo)

@3 months ago with 3805 notes
@3 months ago
#Doveroofspinning #overexcited 

truyorkbity:

AvaLynn was attacked by another student on the school playground. We are fighting for answers and for greater supervision at school.

My friend Lacey Harris’s 5 year old daughter was brutalized by another child on the playground at school this week, in Pascagoula, Mississippi. Her face is swollen and bruised beyond recognition, and the only thing the school can tell her is that they “are investigating”

This sweet little 5 year old girl is terrified to return to school. She is in pain and she has been MAIMED. This needs IMMEDIATE media attention. The school and local news are ignoring the mother’s and loved ones’ cries for help. This family needs justice for what has been done to their poor little angel, and not just to be swept under the rug, as the school district is attempting to do. PLEASE shine some light on this situation and force school administration and news media to get some answers!

The mother has started a GoFundMe page to request help for paying medical bills and legal fees, as it looks as though she’s going to have to pursue this route in order to get any justice at all for her little girl. Please, please, share this link on your page. Even if people are unable to donate, please just help us get the word out on what is going on with this poor family.

This is really heartbroken for me and extremely hard to look at.

This is the link to Ava’s donation page.
Please donate and share and PRAY!
God bless you all!

http://www.gofundme.com/doid6w

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@1 month ago with 95892 notes
givemeinternet:

I love this post.

givemeinternet:

I love this post.

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@1 month ago with 168915 notes

Africa Rising 

Article I wrote for the London Economic

@1 month ago

nomalez:

kemetic-dreams:

Head wraps have served as a head cover for Africans, mostly women, since at least the early 1700s. According to Danya London Fashions For All, a group of African slave women appear in a 1707 painting that was created by Dirk Valkenburg, a Danish painter, that depicted them wearing head wraps that appeared high on the forehead and above the ears. However, it is believed that African cultures used head wraps before the days of slavery so that men could show off their wealth and the level of their social status and so that women could prove that they were prosperous and spiritual

African head wraps come in many bright bold colors that animate the face. According to Africa Imports African Business, in West Africa, head wraps are referred to as “gele” in Yoruba or “ichafu” in Ibo. Some African American women continue to wear head wraps to boast their spiritual strength.

Egypt

  • Many of the headdresses worn by Egyptian royalty had their roots in Nubian culture. The “Nubian wig” purposefully resembled the thick hair of Nubian people. Depictions from the 18th Dynasty show both Kiya, a secondary wife of Pharaoh Akhenaten, and Tiye, the mother of Akhenaten and Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Amenhotep III, wearing this headdress. Queens during the Amarna era typically wore the “khat,” a single-colored headcloth.

 

Nubia

  • Ancient Nubian queens wore headdresses more than head wraps. Some headdresses consisted of elaborate fabrics and flowers woven together. Another headdress had the appearance of a vulture, later referred to as the Egyptian double crown and worn by Egyptian queens during the New Kingdom era.



Nigeria

  • "Gele" refers to the Yoruba word for the head wrap commonly associated with Nigeria and West Africa. Both common women and royal queens wore the gele in ancient times, but queens had wraps made of finer material, such as damask — often used for special occasions and worn with a shawl — and colorful aso-oke, material made of silk.

Slave Women and the Head-Wrap

Originally the head-wrap, or turban, was worn by both enslaved men and women. In time, however, it became almost exclusively a female accessory. In the photograph above, the women wear head-wraps, while the men wear hats.

For their white European masters, the slaves’ head-wraps were signs of poverty and subordination. Accounts of clothing distribution show that masters sometimes allotted extra handkerchiefs to their female slaves, ostensibly to be used as head coverings. In fact, in certain areas of the South, legislation appeared that required Afrakan women to wear their hair bound up in this manner.

The head-wrap, however, was more than a badge of enslavement imposed on female slaves by their owners. Embellishment of the head and hair was a central component of dress in various parts of Africa, particularly in West Africa. From the time European fabrics were made available to them, African women wore head-wraps similar to those worn by their enslaved counterparts in America. For these women, the wrap, which varied in form from region to region, signified communal identity. At the same time, the particular appearance of an individual head-wrap was an expression of personal identity.

Detail from the photo of a large group of women wearing head-wraps

In America, the head-wrap was a utilitarian item, which kept the slave’s hair protected from the elements in which she worked and helped to curb the spread of lice. Yet, as in Africa, the head-wrap also created community — as an item shared by female slaves — and individuality, as a thing unique to the wearer. Cassandra Stancil, enslaved in her youth, insisted that she never asked another woman how to tie her head-scarf. “I always figured I could do it,” she said, “I could try and experiment and if not get that, get something that I liked.”

The head-wrap was an object of oppression from one vantage point. But from the other, the perspective of the slave community, it was a vehicle of empowerment and a memento of freedom.

The headwrap which originated in sub-Saharan Africa carried symbolic meaning in reference to spirituality, wealth, prosperity and class. It later took on a prominent identity in the times of the slavery in America and thereafter continued to be a fashionable but conscientious statement for women of African origin.

The colorful wraps also kept a person eyes to the face of a woman and not here body!

What an interesting post! Thank you for this!

Links:  World-History-Society / Fashion-mode / Black Girls  .  .

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@3 months ago with 9716 notes
@3 months ago with 1 note
#alicia keys #beyonce #adriana lima #Brazil #Put It in a Love Song 

vex138:

and stop viewing feminists as man haters!

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@3 months ago with 173749 notes

the day u go out looking a mess is the day u see the hottest people

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@3 months ago with 113018 notes